Celebrating Christmas In Scotland

Bag piping Buskers Holiday Serenade

Paula’s Perspective

Six years ago, my husband and I moved to Florida and left behind our family and friends along with all the Christmas obligations. What amazed me is how I never realized you cram all these visits, seeing everyone into just a day and half– Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. While it can be fun, it can sometimes be exhausting.

Moving changes all that. Suddenly, there are no obligations and you have a chance to reinvent the holidays without offending anyone. Don’t get me wrong, you do miss your family and all the traditions surrounding the holidays, but it’s really exciting making new traditions.

I’ve personally always wanted to go away for Christmas—to actually wake up in a different country on Christmas morning, celebrating the holidays outside of the United States. Travel opens up your eyes to so many things, but seeing how a country celebrates Christmas is something we don’t often think of doing. And, since I started the whole Scotland thing with Sarah a few years ago, I couldn’t think of anyone else I’d rather continue the adventure with!

Sarah’s Perspective

I first visited Edinburgh, Scotland in 2014 when Paula invited me as a plus one on an international business trip. She suggested a train ride from London to Edinburgh where we could explore the city for a long weekend. On the way to the Boston airport, my mother called and casually mentioned my great-grandmother was born in Scotland. She offered her date of birth and suggested I stop at a genealogical society to find out more information on her.  I was stunned as I have always considered myself Polish by heritage, but quickly took what little information she had, and stuck it in my purse. I forgot about it until we arrived in Edinburgh and walked right by Scotland’s People: a Genealogical Research Center, on the way to our hotel. This began my personal journey into my Scottish genealogy. Over the years, I spent time searching for information on a family history I didn’t know I had and developing an interest in a country that draws me in, like it’s calling me home.

Deciding to spend Christmas in Edinburgh with my family was appealing, although I had my reservations. Traveling during a major holiday can be stressful and I was concerned my children would be disappointed we weren’t following our traditional Christmas schedule. Edinburgh turned out to be a fantastic way to re-energize our family bond, discover new traditions and explore a fairy tale like landscape. Edinburgh Castle is always within the eye’s periphery when in Edinburgh and the gothic silhouette of the city is the perfect place to recapture what is magical about the holidays.

Carnival Rides Edinburgh Christmas Market
The ferris wheel all lit up for the holidays
Sarah and Rob Edinburgh Christmas Market
Strolling through the Edinburgh Christmas Market enjoying a wee dram of whiskey
Edinburgh Christmas Market Day View
A view of the market in daylight

Edinburgh has a large German style Christmas Market that begins weeks before and ends just after Christmas. We spent time exploring the vendor stalls, riding Carnival style rides, drinking mulled wine and hot chocolate made with real Bavarian melted chocolate.  We ate German sausage and Scottish meat pies, and enjoyed being serenaded by traditionally dressed bagpiping buskers.

Christmas Eve dinner was spent at The Witchery: a uniquely decorated medieval restaurant, rich in history and within the shadows of Edinburgh Castle, followed by a stroll through the Royal Botanic Gardens, decorated with millions of twinkling lights. Ticket holders walk through the displays as Christmas music plays in the background, and Santa and his helpers are seen preparing for what will be a long night.

The Witchery Edinburgh
Outside The Witchery for our Christmas Eve Dinner
Royal Botanic Gardens Edinburgh
A scene from the Royal Botanic Gardens in Edinburgh
Edinburgh's Royal Mile
Edinburgh’s Royal Mile decorated for the festive season

Christmas Day was spent lounging in front of our hotel provided personal Christmas tree (it was a complete surprise), opening gifts from the stockings I brought and hung in our lounge room. It was a mild, sunny day, and we hiked to both Arthur’s Seat and Calton Hill: two popular and scenic over looks in Edinburgh.  Although most of the city was shut down: no public transport was available; the city was still alive with people, enjoying the beauty of The Royal Mile and other major landmarks that make Edinburgh so special. Tourist shops were open for business, as well as a wine shop and several takeaway restaurants.

Scottish Malt Whiskey Society
Entrance to the Scottish Malt Whisky Society thanks to the Eat Walk Food Tour
Makar's Mash Bar
Eat Walk Food Tour at Makar’s Mash Bar Stop–best mashed potatoes ever!
Scottish Malt Whiskey Society
Enjoying our whiskey after our Haggis tasting

My son and youngest daughter asked if this year we could celebrate the holiday with a few of the traditions we enjoyed in Scotland. I just bought a set of Christmas crackers and am researching where to buy a few Christmas Crowns.

Hiking Up to Arthur's Seat
A view on the way up to Arthur’s Seat
The View from Arthur's Seat
What a gorgeous view of Edinburgh from the top of Arthur’s Seat!
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Our first experience with Christmas Crackers!

These are a few of our Favorite Festive Things to do In Edinburgh:

Edinburgh Christmas Market

Royal Botanic Gardens

Eat Walk Food Tour

The Witchery

Mimi’s Bake Shop

Hiking Up to Arthur’s Seat

A Scotland Do It Yourself Pub Crawl

Traveling during the holidays can be a fun, enriching experience.  Scotland is a magical, soulful country that makes you believe in the magic of Christmas all over again.

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